News

LUXEMBOURG 05.2019 (T WATTS, J-J RUPPERT)

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WHY DO STUDENTS WHO ARE ELIGIBLE TO ENTER UNIVERSITY FALL INTO ACADEMIC PROBATION AND WHAT POSSIBILITIES ARE THERE FOR EFFECTIVE INTERVENTIONS?
Salim Atay, Jean-Jacques Ruppert, Fatma Gür, Neşe Gülmez and Hakan Kılıç

Abstract

Probation is an academic status of students who do not meet at least the lower limit criteria of Grade Point Average (GPA) that is specified by the university. Probation also restricts the number of credit points that can be loaded. It is a growing problem with many different origins. It has been studied for many years with e.g. The Student Adaptation to College Questionnaire (SACQ) which consists of four subscales that are social adjustment, personal – emotional adjustment, academic adjustment and institutional attachment (Gerdes & Mallinckrodt, 1994). In 2014 Istanbul Technical University (ITU) Dean of Student and Registrar’s Office published a General Statistical Evaluation Report specifying the problem of academic probation. In this study we aimed to identify the reasons for academic probation and set up an intervention model within the University Career Center. For this purpose, semi- structured interviews and group discussions were conducted with 182 undergraduate students from 13 faculties who were on academic probation. Data analysis using Qualitative Data Analysis Software (MAXQDA), allowed to determine the reasons for academic probation . Once the reasons had been identified, existing tools were improved and new tools were developed. After implementation of interventions such as promoting career summits, utilizing a web portal, informing university administration of the importance and necessity for creating open areas, results were measured. At the end of a two year period of strenuous efforts, we were able to observe that those measures were efficient as the probation rate had dropped from 23.46% to 17.08% (ITU Dean of Student and Registrar’s Office, 2014, 2016).

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DECISIONS, DECISIONS, DECISIONS OR HOW DO SECONDARY EDUCATION STUDENTS GO ABOUT MAKING IMPORTANT CHOICES?
Andreas Frey and Jean-Jacques Ruppert

Abstract

The authors studied the decision-making strategies used by secondary education students at specific key moments and investigated which heuristics were being used at what point in time. Students going to see a guidance counsellor have either already made a decision or are very close to doing so. ‘Parents/siblings/family’ and the internet were considered by all the students as the most useful sources of information. On the whole, satisfaction with the information with which students were provided was high for all students. The students’ options upon attaining their educational/vocational training goals were judged to be the most important information. The so-called ‘take the best’ heuristic appears to be the dominant strategy governing decision-making in regards to educational transitions. Hence the authors advocate a change from rational to heuristic decision-making models in guidance and career counselling. This would also imply the promotion of a demand-oriented information management system in which the counsellor should accept the role of an expert capable of delivering adequate, individualised and weighted information to meet the demands of the counselee.

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PADOVA 06.2013 (J-J RUPPERT, J GUICHARD, R ABBAS & B-J ERTELT)

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